20. Tengu Cup (10.06-11.06)

This year will be the 20th time we hold the Tengu-Cup Turnament in Frankfurt. We are looking forward to meet with kendoka from Germany and many other countries on June 10th to find the best fighters in the different categories. As in the last years we expect a great many contestants and a very high level of skill, so this will be a good chance for all to test their mettle.

You can find picture from Tengu Cup 2017 >HERE<

Advice on the equipment

Trial training

During the trial training the participant can wear training trousers and t-shirt. Kendo is trained bare feet. Shinai (bamboo sword) and bokuto (wooden sword) can be borrowed from Katana during the trial period.

Training up to 6th Kyu

After the initial trial training, it makes sense to buy the Shinai and Bokuto. Until the participant manages the 6th Kyu examination, training takes place with training trousers and t-shirt. The 6th Kyu examination normally takes place after 2 to 3 month of training. It is best to consult the trainer, whether or not one should participate in the examination.

Training from 6th Kyu

After passing 6th Kyu, the participant can wear the Kendo clothes – Hakama (trousers) and Keigo-Gi (top/jacket). The trainers will help with giving advice on size and maintenance of the clothes.

From the 6th Kyu onwards Shinai training will be held with a partner. Therefore it might be a good idea having a second shinai, in case the other one needs to be repaired. Repair and maintenance guidance for the shinai can be request from the trainers.

Training from 5th Kyu

After passing the 5th Kyu examination, Tare (lower body protector) and Do (stomach / chest protector) will be worn.
Depending on the progress of the group, Kote (cloves) and Men (helmet) will be worn as well.
At the beginning, Tare, Kote, Do and Men can be borrowed from Katana for during the training.

Training from 4th Kyu

From the 4th Kyu onwards, the training will take place with the whole equipment mentioned above. Therefore it make sense to buy the own equipment at this stage. The trainers can help on giving advice on the equipment in terms of size or quality differences.

If one hasn’t got the own equipment yet, it is possible to borrow it for trainings or the holiday period against a deposit of € 100,- from Katana. Please contact the trainer in advance and fill out the respective form (can be obtained from the trainer).

The beginners training is split into three levels, respectively three groups. One to two trainers will look after each of the groups.

As soon as one reached the third group of the beginner level, it is also possible to train with the advanced group on Thursday.

As soon as one gets the own equipment, Katana will subsidise the Zekken. The Zekken is the so called name tag (written in Japanese and German) and also shows the name of the Kendo club (in Japanese and German) and will be worn on the Tare.

It is also possible to buy a club jacket. This jacket is subsidized by Katana and so the final price is € 70,- per jacket. In case you would like to have your name printed on the jacket, an additional € 10,- occurs./p>

Kendo Ausrüstung

Das Anlegen und Pflegen der Ausrüstung ist ein wichtiger Bestandteil von Kendo.
Hilfe bietet das Handbuch zur Handhabung von Rüstungen (PDF, 2,2 MB)

What is meant by Kendo?

The word Kendo is of Japanese origin and means“way of the sword”.

The way was originally referred to as way of life. To follow the way of the sword , it simply meant to earn his daily bread by the handling of the sword , hence belonging to the warrior caste. Only its members were allowed to wear a sword . Later influences through Buddhism onto the path as a way to enlightenment or to self-improvement did not result in contradiction. The original concept was constantly expanded through the reflection of dealing with death. Miyamoto Musashi (1564-1645 , pictured with two bokken) who attained enlightenment by the practice of swordsmanship, repeatedly emphasized the importance of ceaseless practice to perfection.

Sword is synonymous with Katana, the slightly curved Japanese sword that is only sharp on the convex side. It is considered as the highlight of blacksmithing that has not been reached so far again. The Katana was extremely sharp. Cutting an opponent from top to bottom into half did hardly require any physical strength, but only the clear and smooth handling of the blade while keeping the cutting line.

History

Today’s Kendo was developed in the mid-18th century. The kendo armor was introduced that consists of Men (helmet), Kote (gloves), Do (breast protector) and Tare (hip protector), and the fencing sword made of bamboo, the Shinai. The practical training and the competition training no longer only focused on the learning of the Kata forms, but also included sporting rules. The armor protects the allowed body areas where points can be scored. Although Kendo is a full contact sport, it is one of the sports with the least risk of injury. In 1911, Kendo was listed as an official school sport for all schools for the first time and thus laid the foundation for the modern Kendo.

1912, the Japanese Budo Association unified the so far wide variety of Kata forms and reduced them to the usual 10 basic shapes – the Nihon Kendo Kata – that we know today. Kendo was gradually modernised and became so widely used as a national sport that it was also applied for military purposes in World War 2. Hence, it was banned by the Allies after the war. The peace treaty of 1951 and the associated recovery of independence allowed kendo to return. In October 1952, the new Japanese Kendo Federation was founded. However, the state was initially promoting Kendo very cautiously and only in the early sixties, it became compulsory Budo subject at the schools, again.

In addition to the recorded course content at a school, the tradition of ‘kuden’ or spoken word developed that included the deeper teachings of a school and was only transmitted verbally from teacher to student. In some schools, this tradition is kept alive up to the present day.

From the 17th century Kendo was an essential part of the training of the Samurai, the Japanese knight . At that time Kendo merged with the concept of Bushido (way of the warrior) that is an important part of Japanese intellectual history and required in addition to pure technique the formation of a spiritual force. The merger of Kendo with the teachings of Buddhism, as well as with the ones of Confucianism reached its peak in the mental training. This meant for the education of the Samurai to also pursued objectives such as human love, justice, courtesy, wisdom and loyalty.

Modern Kendo

In 1911, Kendo was introduced as the official school sport for all schools for the first time and thus laid the foundation for the modern Kendo. 1912, the Japanese Budo Association unified the so far wide variety of Kata forms and reduced them to the usual 10 basic shapes – the Nihon Kendo Kata – that we know today. Gradually Kendo was modernised so that it could become a popular national sport. Kendo was also placed into the military live, so after World War 2 it was consequently banned by the Allies. The peace treaty of 1951 and the associated recovery of independence allowed kendo to return.

Now, children and women began to learn Kendo. Moreover, Kendo started growing popularity outside Japan and is being offered as an activity in over hundred thousand places across many countries . This internationalisation was especially expressed in the world championships , which are organised every three years by the FIK (International Kendo Federation). Today, Kendo – a non-gender and age-related martial art – is widely trained not only in Japan but also in many other countries.

In Germany, the interest in Kendo is steadily growing, too. Well trained kendoka achieved good performance in German as well as European and World Championships . As much as it has been adopted into its sporty and modern character, it is important to understand the developments of Kendo and then incorporate this understanding into the fight. This also includes the Japanese Samurai thought of applying familiar psychological moments like directness, unity of will, spontaneous decision and enforceability into the fight. Not surprising, these Samurai elements are up-to-date to our today’s living and we can learn these from modern Kendo.

17. Tengu-Cup 2014

Zum 17. mal hat am 14. Juni 2014 Katana Frankfurt den Tengu-Cup ausgerichtet. Jedes Jahr zieht dieses Turnier Kendoka aus der ganzen Welt an.
Der Katana Vorstand möchte sich hiermit bei allen Teilnehmern, Schiedrichtern und den vielen Helfern für ein erfolgreiches und schönes Turnier bedanken. Außerdem wünscht Katana allen Dan- und Kyu-Prüflingen, die am Sonntag ihre Prüfungen bestanden haben, einen herzlichen Glückwunsch.

Bilder zum Tengu Cup 2014 findet Ihr >HIER<


16. Tengu-Cup 2013

Zum 16. mal hat am 15. Juni 2013 Katana Frankfurt den Tengu-Cup ausgerichtet. Jedes Jahr zieht dieses Turnier Kendoka aus der ganzen Welt an.
Der Katana Vorstand möchte sich hiermit bei allen Teilnehmern, Schiedrichtern und den vielen Helfern für ein erfolgreiches und schönes Turnier bedanken. Außerdem wünscht Katana allen Dan- und Kyu-Prüflingen, die am Sonntag ihre Prüfungen bestanden haben, einen herzlichen Glückwunsch.

Bilder zum Tengu Cup 2013 findet Ihr >HIER<


15. Tengu Cup 2012

Zum 15. mal hat am 16. Juni 2012 Katana Frankfurt den Tengu-Cup ausgerichtet. Jedes Jahr zieht dieses Turnier Kendoka aus der ganzen Welt an.
Der Katana Vorstand möchte sich hiermit bei allen Teilnehmern, Schiedrichtern und den vielen Helfern für ein erfolgreiches und schönes Turnier bedanken. Außerdem wünscht Katana allen Dan- und Kyu-Prüflingen, die am Sonntag ihre Prüfungen bestanden haben, einen herzlichen Glückwunsch.

Bilder zum Tengu Cup 2012 findet Ihr >HIER<

Ergebnisse

14. Tengu-Cup 2011

Zum 14. mal hat am 18. Juni 2011 Katana Frankfurt den Tengu-Cup ausgerichtet. Jedes Jahr zieht dieses Turnier Kendoka aus der ganzen Welt an.
Der Katana Vorstand möchte sich hiermit bei allen Teilnehmern, Schiedrichtern und den vielen Helfern für ein erfolgreiches und schönes Turnier bedanken. Außerdem wünscht Katana allen Dan- und Kyu-Prüflingen, die am Sonntag ihre Prüfungen bestanden haben, einen herzlichen Glückwunsch.

Bilder zum Tengu Cup 2011 findet Ihr >HIER<


Ergebnisse

13. Tengu Cup 2010

Zum 13. mal hat am 19. Juni 2010 Katana Frankfurt den Tengu-Cup ausgerichtet. Jedes Jahr zieht dieses Turnier Kendoka aus der ganzen Welt an.
Der Katana Vorstand möchte sich hiermit bei allen Teilnehmern, Schiedrichtern und den vielen Helfern für ein erfolgreiches und schönes Turnier bedanken. Außerdem wünscht Katana allen Dan- und Kyu-Prüflingen, die am Sonntag ihre Prüfungen bestanden haben, einen herzlichen Glückwunsch.

Bilder zum Tengu Cup 2010 findet Ihr >HIER<


Ergebnisse